Audubon Golf Certification – All 6 Categories approved

NCC Logo

All 6 categories approved and certified: 

  1. Environmental Planning
  2. Wildlife and Habitat Management
  3. Chemical Use Reduction and Safety
  4. Water Conservation
  5. Water Quality Management
  6. Outreach and Education

Certification in the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program for Golf Courses (ACSP) is a significant accomplishment. A Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary designated golf course demonstrates environmental leadership in the golf industry.

Golf course staff and members can take pride in knowing that Niakwa Country Club provides significant wildlife habitat and is maintained in an environmentally responsible manner.

By managing the property with a high degree of environmental quality, certified courses provide green space for people and wildlife while contributing to climate conservation for future generations.

Niakwa Country Club has done an exceptional job by completing all 6 certification requirements before the end of the 2022 golf season.

NCC WILDFLOWER GARDEN

This spring, the out-of-play area between the 10th and 12th Tee boxes will become the location of a Wildflower Garden to offer a habitat for Monarch butterflies.

42 species of tall grass prairie, short grass prairie and wetlands plants have been ordered with a heavy emphasis on wildflowers including Milkweed – needed by Monarchs to sustain their life cycle.  

All plants are sourced from Prairie Originals, a local native plant grower working only with local genetics. Once mature this garden will support nectar loving birds, butterflies, bees – but not deer! …along with enhancing the natural aesthetics of the golf course. 

MONARCHS in the ROUGH

A Wonder of the World, Monarchs have declined by more than 90% over the last 2 decades.  NCC joins with Audubon International to restore a habitat and migration area for Monarchs in out-of-play areas of our golf course and creating awareness of how the golf course can contribute significantly to a world-wide conservation challenge.

NCC Horticulturalist, Daphne Stapley leads the naturalization of woodland and the seeding of Milkweed off the river bank at Hole 10 to the back of the 12th tee complex. Milkweed provides the environment where Monarchs lay their eggs and is the food that larvae need to complete their metamorphosis into adult butterflies.  This area will be declared environmentally sensitive, denoted with appropriate signage.

NCC’s participation in #MonarchsInTheRough contributes to the ecological naturalization of our golf sanctuary and serves a community leadership role in global conservation stewardship.

From Bees to Honey

One of the first signs of fall is the harvesting of honey! Once the bees have filled the frames in their honey supers and covered them in a white wax cap it is time to prepare to harvest.

An escape board is used to separate the bees from their honey, the bees can move down through the maze into the brood chamber (the lower boxes where they live). The board is placed between the supers and brood chambers and after a few days the bees should have left and the frames of honey can be removed.

Once the bees have left the honey supers through the escape boards the frames of honey can be removed.

First the honey is tested using a refractometer, the refractometer measures how light passes through a fluid to determine its moisture content and therefore its ripeness.

If honey is bottled while unripe it can spoil.

The honey is brought to the kitchen for processing where the wax capping is removed with a warm knife, this is known as uncapping.

The uncapped honey is placed in the extractor which spins the frames launching the honey out onto the walls of the extractor, the honey is then passed through a two stage filter and is ready to eat!

Turtle

Derek Benson

Niakwa-Turtle-Tracks-2.JPG Niakwa-Turtle-Walking-1.jpg Niakwa-Turtle-Watching-0.jpg

August 31st, 2022. 7 am. #15 green

Young Bucks

  • Post author:
  • Post category:Mammals

Paul

IMG_1036.jpeg

3 Young Bucks lounging on the course. August 4th, 2022.

Fawns

Tammy Gibson

443DB573-F4FC-49B0-A9C8-1DE1E9747D8E-1.jpeg D2CE6926-DEDE-4789-AC5D-25A1EA6ED2B5-0.jpeg

In the grass between 10th white tees and 18th green

Deer

Jeff Kenny

July-3-B.jpg

July 03, 2022, two of the three deer that were making their way across the practice tee.

Fawns

Jeff Kenny

July-2-B-1.jpg July-2-A-0.jpg

July 02, 2022, two fawns next to the 12th tee.